Aggregate Designs Corporation, Serving the Aggregate, Asphalt, Concrete, and Mining Industries.
 
Equipment Catalog
Asphalt Plants
Asphalt Misc.
Asphalt Reclaimers
Concrete Plants
Conveyors
Crushers
Jaw
Jaw / Cone
Jaw / Roll
Cone
Impact
Recycle
Roll
Track Mount
Feeders
Generator Sets
Pugmills
Rock Drills
Screen Plants
Wash Plants
Miscellaneous
Rolling Stock
Compactors
Dozers
Dump Trucks
Excavators
Trenchers
Wheel Loaders
** Latest Additions
Industry Links
Search our site
General Information
Asphalt Plants
Asphalt Misc.
ALmix Drum Mixer
Jaw Crushers
Cone Crushers
Pugmills
 

ADC CONE CRUSHER INFORMATION

Used Cone Crushers for Sale

1 

Cone Crushers — an Introduction

Part 1 — Components of a Cone Crusher

2 

Cone Crusher Manganese Mantle

3 

Cone Crusher Concave Liner (Manganese)

4 

Main Shaft

5 

Cone Crusher Counter Shaft

6 

Input Sheave/Flywheel

7 

Cone Crusher Bearings: Main & Counter

8 

Cone Crusher Springs

9 

Cone Crusher Protection: Hydraulic Cylinders

10 

Cone Crusher Beveled Gears

11 

Top Cell Liners

Part 2 — Important Considerations for Cone Crushers

12 

Cone Crusher Mantle Diameter

13 

Fine vs Standard Head Size

14 

Remote Adjustment in Cone Crushers

Part 3 — Cone Crusher Illustrations

Cone Crushers — an Introduction

This section of the Aggregate Designs Corporation web site is intended to inform the reader about different aspects of cone crushers.  They are sometimes called gyratory cone crushers.  Cone crushers crush rock between two conical surfaces called the mantle (lower movable surface) and the concave liners above.  These surfaces do the actual crushing and are constructed of high manganese steel.  Cone crushers can be used in a primary crushing role but are typically seen more often in a secondary or tertiary position.  There are two types of cone crushers with respect to the pay product size: stand head and fine head cone crushers.  Fine head cone crushers have a reduced-size opening and so can't take as large of feed material but can produce a finer output product.  Crushing action is achieved by the eccentric movement of the lower portion of the main shaft.  The mantle is connected to this main shaft.  The gyrating action of the main shaft causes the gaps between the mantle and liners to change dimension and perform the actual crushing.

Part 1 — Components of a Cone Crusher

Cone Crusher Manganese Mantle

The mantle is one of the actual crushing surfaces in the cone crusher  It is the one that moves in a rotary pattern driven by the counter shaft to crush rock between itself and the immobile liners.  The mantle doesn't actually rotate; rather it moves in a circular pattern due to an eccentric lobe on the main shaft.

Cone Crusher Concave Liner (Manganese)

The concave cone liners are the other surface that does actual crushing.  The liner is shaped like an inverted cone (big side down) with the upper side have an opening that will accept the material to be crushed.  These are also made of durable manganese for long life.

Main Shaft

The main shaft is what the mantle is mounted to and is supported by bearings at its base and right below the mantle.  It is driven by spiral bevel gears from the counter shaft.  It does not rotate, rather it is housed in a frame that does rotate.  The bearings in this frame are put off-center, creating the oscillatory motion.  Depending on the model the ring gear may be located at the bottom or top of the main shaft.

Cone Crusher Counter Shaft

This shaft transfers rotary motion into the cone crusher.  On the exterior end of the shaft is a sheave, on the interior side is a pinion gear that drives the eccentric main shaft housing.  These assemblies are often lubricated with a oil bath system with a cooling mechanism.

Input Sheave/Flywheel

The exterior end of the counter shaft has a V-groove sheave on it.  Around 6 V-belts can be used to turn the countershaft.  The mass of the sheave helps to keep the cone crusher gyrating, but its mass isn't as critical as that of a jaw crusher.  Electric motors are typically used to turn this sheave with 200 electrical horsepower being typical.

Cone Crusher Bearings: Main & Counter

These are typically tapered roller bearings in an oil bath lubrication system.  The alloys of these can often contain lead due to its effectiveness in lubrication retention.

Cone Crusher Springs

Part of the safety mechanism to prevent damage to a cone crusher during operation are large springs that put downward pressure on the upper frame (the one holding the liners).  Should some piece of non-crushable piece of material enter the cone the springs can allow the liner half to rise and prevent damage.

Cone Crusher Protection: Hydraulic Cylinders

Hydraulic cylinders (typically actuated by noble gasses like nitrogen vs hydraulic oil) can collapse the springs and allow uncrushable material to exit the cone.  This can be automatically actuated should the cone stop motion during operation.

Cone Crusher Beveled Gears

This gear set translates the horizontal rotary motion of the counter shaft into the vertical rotary motion of the main shaft.  They are typically forged and cut for strength and low noise.

Top Cell Liners

Material to be crushed enters the cone chamber through something called the top cell, which is typically lined with manganese liners.  A device called a rotary feed distributor is sometimes added to the top cell to distribute the input material evenly throughout the bowl.  When feeding a cone from a screen the rock obviously is always entering the crushing chamber on one side of the bowl only, the rotary feed distributor slings the materials around both side of the cone head, filling the crushing chamber more evenly resulting in potentially a better wear pattern and even better gradation from the full choke fed feed chamber.

Part 2 — Important Considerations for Cone Crushers

Cone Crusher Mantle Diameter

Cone crushers come in different sizes depending on desired production output rates.  This size also determines the maximum diameter of input material the cone crusher can handle.

Fine vs Standard Head Size

This has to do with the clearance built into the mantle in terms of its distance from the liners.  Fine heads have less clearance and can produce a finer output product while standard heads allow for a larger output product.

Remote Adjustment in Cone Crushers

Remote adjusters in cone crushers are a quite valuable feature, often adding $100,000 to $150,000 to the price of a unit.  They allow for "on-the-fly" adjustment of the mantle/liner clearance distance.  If you don't have this feature you must stop the crusher and adjust it with wrenches.  Some manufacturers included this as a standard feature.

Part 3 — Cone Crusher Illustrations *

Cutaway view of a Cone crusher.  Click on the picture to open a separate window with a larger view  
Another cutaway view of a cone crusher.  Click on the picture to open a separate window with a larger view  
Animated view of a cone crusher operating.  V-belts that drive counter shaft via sheave omitted for clarity  

 * Trademarks and photos are property of their respective companies

Used Cone Crushers for Sale



Serving the Aggregate, Asphalt, Concrete, and Mining Industries
Throughout the Americas, Africa, the Caribbean, the Middle East & the Pacific Rim.
Quality, New, Used and Reconditioned Construction and Mining Equipment
ADM | Advanced | ALmix | CMI | Cedarapids | Deister | Eagle | Fab Tec
Hewitt-Robins | JCI | Lippman-Milwaukee | Nordberg | Pioneer | Telsmith
 
     

· Aggregate Designs Corporation ·
Grand Junction, Colorado 81506
Phone 970-245-2435                         Fax 970-245-3008